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B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel

  • Definition
    • B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel is a blood test that looks for certain proteins on the surface of white blood cells called B-lymphocytes. The proteins are markers that may help diagnose leukemia or lymphoma.

  • Alternative Names
    • B lymphocyte cell surface markerspasting; Flow cytometry - leukemia/lymphoma immunophenotyping

  • How the Test is Performed
    • A blood sample is needed.

      In some cases, white blood cells are removed during a bone marrow biopsy. The sample may also be taken during a lymph node biopsy or other biopsy when lymphoma is suspected.

      The blood sample is sent to a laboratory, where a specialist checks the cell type and characteristics. This procedure is called immunophenotyping. The test is usually done using a technique called flow cytometry.

  • How to Prepare for the Test
    • No special preparation is usually necessary.

  • How the Test will Feel
    • When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon goes away.

  • Why the Test is Performed
    • This test may be done for the following reasons:

      • When other tests (such as a blood smear) show signs of abnormal white blood cells
      • When leukemia or lymphoma is suspected
      • To find out the type of leukemia or lymphoma
  • What Abnormal Results Mean
  • Risks
    • Veins and arteries vary in size from one person to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.

      Other risks associated with having blood drawn are slight, but may include:

      • Excessive bleeding
      • Fainting or feeling lightheaded
      • Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin)
      • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)
  • References
    • Appelbaum FR. The acute leukemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 183.

      Bierman PJ, Armitage JO. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 185.

      Borowitz MJ. Flow cytometry in oncologic diagnosis. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 15.

      Connors JM. Hodgkin lymphoma. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 186.