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Culture - duodenal tissue

  • Definition
    • A duodenal tissue culture is a laboratory exam to check a piece of tissue from the first part of the small intestine (duodenum). The test is to look for organisms that cause infection.

  • Alternative Names
    • Duodenal tissue culture

  • How the Test is Performed
    • A piece of tissue from the first part of the small intestine is taken during an upper endoscopy (esophagogastroduodenoscopy).

      The sample is then sent to a lab. There it is placed in a special dish (culture media) that allows bacteria or viruses to grow. The sample is looked at under a microscope regularly to see if any organisms are growing.

      Organisms that grow on the culture are identified.

  • How to Prepare for the Test
    • This is a test done in a lab. The sample is collected during an upper endoscopy and biopsy procedure (esophagogastroduodenoscopy). Ask your health care provider how to prepare for this procedure.

  • Why the Test is Performed
    • A culture of duodenal tissue is done to check for bacteria or viruses that may lead to certain illnesses and conditions.

  • Normal Results
    • No harmful bacteria or viruses are found.

  • What Abnormal Results Mean
    • An abnormal finding means that harmful bacteria or a virus has been found in the tissue sample. Bacteria may include:

      • Campylobacter
      • Helicobacter pylori
      • Salmonella
  • Considerations
    • Other tests are very often done to look for infection-causing organisms in duodenal tissue. These tests include the urease test (for example, the CLO test) and histology (looking at the tissue under a microscope).

      Routine culture for H pylori is not currently recommended.

  • References
    • Beavis KG, Charnot-Katsikas A. Specimen collection and handling for diagnosis of infectious diseases. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 64.

      Dupont HL. Approach to the patient with suspected enteric infection. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 283.

      Fritsche TR, Pritt BS. Medical parasitology. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 63.

      Haines CF, Sears CL. Infectious enteritis and proctocolitis. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 110.

      Semrad CE. Approach to the patient with diarrhea and malabsorption. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 140.

      Siddiqi HA, Salwen MJ, Shaikh MF, Bowne WB. Laboratory diagnosis of gastrointestinal and pancreatic disorders In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 22.